tuchesuavae

tuchesuavae:

This is the best ish ever for a lot of reasons. He is teaching his younger brother a lot of lessons; perseverance,  hard work, dedication, temperance, that violence is not always the answer, how not to potentially endanger those in your care by physical retaliation, understanding… This is exactly why I advicate for martial arts. It is not about violence, about blood lust, about fighting at all really. You learn the things a lot of people who are not trained in a martial art don’t, you r perception and how you respond and read a situatioan is different. Your eagerness to respond physically is lowered because you really understand what hitting does far better than one who doesn’t, you can avoid it better and humble yourself more because that is the core of all martial arts. You know how to defend yourself and those who need defence if and ONLY if it is needed and you can decern when that last resort is. Mma, kung fu, muy thai, caporea, karate, boxing, taekwando, wrestling, wushu, tai chi, judo, jujitsu…. all forms have great things to offwr for peace and evolving as people.

You guys honestly watch this

fausttaichou

fausttaichou:

Interesting story on this one. Monique Sciberras is a 10 year old with a mild case of autism, and her parents found that the best way to keep her engaged was through training, specifically in Muay Thai style kickboxing. In this training video, you can see her sheer power and focus. She looks like a little Mike Tyson with those punches.

Mental debilitating conditions don’t make people “less smart” but restructures HOW they think. An idea may seem silly to adults, but that is only because WE DON’T view it in its simplest form.

A story from Grand-Master Pereira was that he had an autistic student who was having trouble with keeping the four directions straight. After class he asked the student how many walls he saw. The student proceeded to count all the walls in sight, including where the wall jutted out form a support beam. Master P took the student to a different room that only had 4 walls and asked him to repeat the pattern then the student understood it because he now had ONLY 4 walls and thus four turns. This was the first time his mother had ever seen her son complete any “advanced task” by himself without being walked through it. 


Martial arts, dance, and other physical outlets are prime sources of help. It helps slow alzheimers and other dementia, as well as autistic or mentally handicapped individuals. So if you haven’t already think about starting a Martial Arts program or Dance studio to help stay active.